https://sakai.rutgers.edu/access/content/group/bbaa884c-243c-4e87-9d4c-42ebcd020180/Readings/Lange.pdf

One of my professors shared this link with our class and i thought it was pretty interesting. This article by Patricia G. Lange sheds light on the concept of video blogs made by women video bloggers who explore ideas about self-image, helping others, and diversity and how sharing intimacies can be socially transformative. In  her article, Lange uses several contemporary examples to demonstrate how certain women video bloggers use intimacy to create reactions in audiences that promote reconsideration of the viewers’ ideas about social action and values.

“Many video bloggers find tremendous value in sharing intimate moments with the world to gain greater insight about themselves and others, and about social interaction,” says Lange.

The author discusses personal and vulnerable types of engagements some female video bloggers use to dispel sexist views and stereotypes. She also highlights the sharing of personal information as well as intimate moments of “good Samaritan,” acts to ignite a greater sense of interpersonal concern throughout our society. Lastly, she discusses the use of intimacy to promote diversity and awareness of social taboos.

I read this article and felt like it was a joke. There is no way any of her points can be viewed as facts and they dont necessarily explain how social change can occur.  In my opinion, social transformation is unattainable via intimate video blogging because the views shared on the blog do not reach people on a national level. Likewise, I disagree with Lange’s argument that women bloggers who share their information and intimate experiences to prompt viewers to lend a helping hand to Internet strangers in distress. It does not discuss the dangers that may stem from intervening in a situation involving a stranger. However, I do agree with the concept that a woman’s use of intimacy in video blogging can provide a space for open discussions on diversity which can cause pre-existing assumptions and beliefs to be reconsidered.

The author refers to an situation involving a viewer, Senft, who watched as a woman volgged her attempt at suicide. Because the woman shared her address online, Sneft physically went to the victim’s house to investigate the situation. By going to a stranger’s house Sneft could have placed herself in a great deal of danger. Secondly, Lange made no indication that Sneft was professionally trained to handle a suicide attempt, which further suggests that she should not have intervened. I feel woman vloggers who use intimacy to promote social action and feel comfortable with sharing their personal information are making themselves susceptible to Internet harm. This was not only an asinine decision, but it could have had terrible repercussions. 

Should people who view blogs feel obligated or comofrtable to get involved in potentially dangerous sitations with internt strangers, in the way that Sneft did?

Although I dont agree with Lange’s feelings towards women who use intimacy in vlogs have enough power to cause social transformation, I do feel that vlogs can serve as an open forum for people explore an array of topics that may not often be addressed offline. I dont blog nor do I follow blogs, but I can appreacite their purpose. We should just use them and share certain things with precaution .

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